Organizing Intersectional Actions

Recently, I’ve been doing some trans/queer organizing that I’ve felt didn’t fit with all of my values. This is something that happens often in organizing, where our ideas for social change don’t yield the benefits we expect from them.

In order to keep myself accountable to the values important to me (most prominently, intersectionality and abolition), I created an organizing worksheet titled “Proposed Action Worksheet.”

I will update this document as needed, but it can be found here, and the link is available on the Resources page. If you have any feedback, let me know!

Activists: Say NO to a Third Gender Marker

I was shocked when I heard that non-binary gender was legal here in Oregon. The overwhelming hatred against our community by the government, the “criminal” “justice” system, and individual and communal violence in the past few years has damaged my ability to hope for meaningful change. In fact, shortly after hearing this news, the shooting in Orlando happened. It seems that no matter what policy changes we gain, the violence persists.

Maybe that’s why I wasn’t too hopeful after I processed the news that Jamie Shupe was the first legally genderless person in the United States. As a non-binary activist, my mind went straight to what this would look like in terms of policy – and I started to worry.

How will the government apply this ruling? What will the requirements be to change sex/gender on legal documents? Will we be able to remove gender markers from our documents, or will they add a third option? How will this process include refugee new arrivals and asylum seekers? How will it include our indigenous and undocumented siblings? Who will this ruling be accessible to?

Most importantly, whose voices will be at the forefront? Over the past few decades, the “LGBT Movement” has largely been a legal and policy reform battle funded by those with the money to effect change. Our revolutionary history has faded, and our community has become increasingly divided by privilege and power. Continue reading “Activists: Say NO to a Third Gender Marker”

Stop Reinforcing Our Oppression: On Dismissing as a Pervasive Tool

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photo credit: Second Place Is The First Loser via photopin (license)

Micro-agressions are being discussed a lot more these days. With the work of prominent national movements like #BlackLivesMatter, media outlets like Everyday Feminism, and many local anti-violence organizations, we are beginning to challenge oppression at every level.

One set of micro-aggressions that I encounter frequently is what I call dismissive micro-aggressions. This set of behaviors is rooted in the idea of respectability politics – a belief that we must act and react the way the oppressive class deems appropriate in order to be taken seriously. It doesn’t happen only from people with privilege though. People who have internalized their oppression perpetuate these ideas and participate in this behavior as well. It is one of the ways in which they adhere to respectability politics in an effort to be accepted by a society which ultimately benefits from their oppression.

Dismissive micro-aggressions include, but are not limited to, the following: Continue reading “Stop Reinforcing Our Oppression: On Dismissing as a Pervasive Tool”

The Political Violence of Passive Discourse: Recognizing a Crisis

On October 8, 2015, Malaysia criminalized transgender women based on their appearance in public spaces through judicial ruling. The ruling was a devastating blow to transgender women in Malaysia, as the lower Court of Appeal deemed the law, section 66, unconstitutional on November 14, 2014.

In response to the ruling, the United Nations (UN) Human Rights Office issued a statement that calls into question the understanding of transgender issues on every level of government. The UN Human Rights Office headlined the article by stating that they are “concerned by [the] criminalization of transgender women in Malaysia.” This response reveals the political violence engendered in our human rights discourse. The matter of criminalizing transgender women is not a mere matter of concern – it directly endangers their lives and well-being. The article does begin to analyze the reality of the situation, but stops short of discussing the violent consequences of the law.

““This law infringes the rights of transgender women, including the right to live with dignity, to freedom of movement, the right to work, to equality before the law and to freedom from discrimination and freedom of expression,” said Matilda Bogner, the Regional Representative of OHCHR’s Southeast Asia office.”

Such phrases as “the right to live with dignity,” “equality before the law,” and “freedom from discrimination” are all buzzwords that have lost their meaning in the violent struggle against oppression that renders certain lives less than human.

Continue reading “The Political Violence of Passive Discourse: Recognizing a Crisis”